State of New Mexico secondary Archives: on Crime


Bob Walsh: Police should not be allowed to arrest without a warrant

Q: Is racism a threat to domestic security in the United States? Why or why not?

A: There is substantial evidence that racism remains widespread. However, the threat to domestic security is mostly local, where the police force is not under control. The police should not be allowed to arrest without a warrant. The exception is a immediate threat of injury or death, in which case everyone has the responsibility to intervene. The absence of bystander assistance should be prima facie evidence that there was no such threat. Police should be held to the same standard of behavior that would apply to a bystander.

Source: AFA iVoterGuide on 2020 New Mexico Senate race Nov 3, 2020

Mark Ronchetti: Federal economic relief would free violent criminals

Ronchetti repeatedly said a House economic relief bill would let violent criminals out of prison. Amid questions about the future of civil rights guarantees and racial equality, Ronchetti said policing reforms on the use of force are being derailed by partisanship, citing languishing proposals from Black GOP Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina.
Source: Bay News TV-9 on 2020 New Mexico Senate race Oct 6, 2020

Mark Ronchetti: COVID: relief bill releases violent criminals from prison

On efforts to craft a new pandemic relief package, Luj n suggested another round of $1,200 direct payments to taxpayers is needed, along with an infusion of federal resources to public schools aimed at reopening classrooms safely. Ronchetti said businesses should have liability protections in coronavirus-related lawsuits. "They shouldn't have to fear frivolous lawsuits," he said. Ronchetti repeatedly said a House economic relief bill would let violent criminals out of prison.
Source: Franklin IN Daily Journal on 2020 New Mexico Senate debate Oct 6, 2020

Mark Ronchetti: Welcomes federal intervention against violent crime

While Luj n touted his efforts on bills generating hundreds of millions of dollars for local police to help with crime-fighting efforts, Ronchetti said he welcomes federal authorities stepping into crime-ridden cities. "Because the job isn't being done within the state," Ronchetti said. ". Someone has to tackle violent crime."
Source: Santa Fe New Mexican on 2020 New Mexico Senate debate Oct 5, 2020

Ben Ray Lujan: Voted for George Floyd Justice in Policing Act of 2020

Q: Restrict police use of force and increase public oversight?

Ben Ray Lujan: Yes. Voted for George Floyd Justice in Policing Act of 2020 "to provide justice for victims of police brutality."

Mark Ronchetti: No. Believes "police officers are good people risking their lives to protect our community and have earned our support."

Source: CampusElect survey of 2020 New Mexico Senate race Sep 30, 2020

Mark Ronchetti: Strongly opposes efforts to defund the police

Support for Law Enforcement: We must fight racism and police brutality, but defunding the police is a reckless and irresponsible scheme that will make our communities less safe. The vast majority of police officers are good people risking their lives to protect our community and have earned our support. Mark strongly opposes efforts to defund the police. Mark will fight to bring more federal help back to New Mexico to fight crime and make our streets safer.
Source: 2020 New Mexico Senate campaign website MarkRonchetti.com Aug 30, 2020

Mark Ronchetti: Federal laws have teeth; we will go after criminals

Mark believes that from the federal-level down to our smallest towns more must be done to get our crime epidemic under control. Mark will work tirelessly with the Department of Justice to get more federal task force resources and additional assistant US Attorneys to put criminals away. It will take years to reform the laws that let criminals out quickly on state and local charges. However, federal laws have teeth, and we will go after criminals in a way that will keep them off our streets.
Source: 2020 New Mexico Senate campaign website MarkRonchetti.com Aug 30, 2020

Ben Ray Lujan: End for-profit prisons, cash bail, mandatory minimums

It is my strong belief that corporations should not profit from human suffering. I've rejected private prison money in my Senate race and support ending for-profit prisons. Creating a more just criminal justice system begins with our courts. We must end the unfair and discriminatory cash bail system that punishes lower-income individuals with prolonged detention. We must trust judges to distribute equal and fair verdicts by ending the use of mandatory minimums--an inherently racist policy.
Source: 2020 New Mexico Senate campaign website BenRayLujan .com Jul 8, 2020

Bob Walsh: Stricter punishment doesn't reduce crime

Q: Do you support or oppose the statement, "Stricter punishment reduces crime"?

A: Strongly oppose

Source: OnTheIssues interview for 2020 New Mexico race May 1, 2020

Michelle Lujan-Grisham: Dangerous, repeat offenders have got to be in jail

Let's all agree that the days of hardened, violent, repeat offenders not doing any real time, getting unwarranted second and third and fourth chances because our system is too broken to hold people accountable . those days must end and they must end now. New Mexicans are sick and tired of seeing predators circle in and out of custody, never facing the full force of the law. I am too. Dangerous, repeat offenders have got to be in jail.
Source: 2020 New Mexico State of the State address Jan 21, 2020

Mark Ronchetti: Opposed to defunding the police

Most police officers are good people and I strongly oppose defunding the police. Additionally, our Albuquerque police officers have already adopted many reforms and I am proud to be endorsed by the Albuquerque Police Officers Association. We need federal law enforcement help to keep our streets safe. Our local government and leadership have abdicated the responsibility and let violent crime skyrocket. We need to support our police department and bring in federal help to keep our streets safe.
Source: Albuquerque Journal on 2020 New Mexico Senate race Jan 7, 2020

Susana Martinez: Increase penalties for many crimes

I learned a long time ago as a prosecutor--and it's just plain common sense--that those who commit crimes will go where the laws are weak and punishments are light. And in New Mexico, they have found their easy mark. Just over a year ago, New Mexicans voted to give judges power they've never had before--to hold dangerous defendants--including repeat offenders--in jail prior to their trial. This session, let's increase penalties for those who use a gun while committing a crime. Crack down on those who repeatedly drive drunk. Require stiffer punishment for those who commit crimes while other charges are pending against them. Pass child protection legislation that would increase penalties on those who prey on, abuse, and kill the most precious and innocent among us. We also need a three-strikes law with real teeth, and those who kill police officers, correctional officers, or children should absolutely face the death penalty.
Source: 2018 New Mexico State of the State address Jan 16, 2018

Joe Cervantes: Underfunding, lack of reform leads to more crime

Q: How do you intend to reduce crime?

A: This administration has cut funding to courts, district attorneys and corrections, leading to the dismissal of cases and the uncertainty of prosecution and punishment. Underfunding of courts and law enforcement leads to the uncontrolled crime we're experiencing. The answer to how we address crime requires a better functioning court system, a better functioning prosecution, predictable arrests and appropriate sentencing.

Source: NM Political Report on 2018 New Mexico Gubernatorial race Jul 7, 2017

Susana Martinez: Vetoed restricting use of solitary confinement on minors

HB 175: Isolated Confinement Act:

Analysis by N.M. Political Report: HB175 restricted certain types of solitary confinement in jails. The bill would have prohibited confining pregnant women, teenagers or inmates with severe behavioral health issues. One opponent says the veto means "taxpayers will continue to pay millions in settlements for over utilizing an outdated and inhumane jail management tool."

Veto Message: HB 175 oversimplifies isolated confinement in such a way so as to eliminate flexibility and endanger the lives of inmates and staff alike. It is possible that a serious youthful offender poses a threat to, or actually engages in a pattern of harmful behavior toward other inmates or staff--HB 175 would prevent the correctional facility from utilizing restricted housing for this inmate.

Legislative Outcome: Passed House 38-22-10 on Mar/11/17; Passed Senate 29-3-10 on Mar/17/17; Vetoed by Gov. Martinez on Apr/6/17

Source: N.M. Political Report on New Mexico voting record HB 175 Mar 30, 2017

Joe Cervantes: Supported restricting use of solitary confinement on minors

HB 175: Isolated Confinement Act:

Analysis by N.M. Political Report: HB175 restricted certain types of solitary confinement in jails. The bill would have prohibited confining pregnant women, teenagers or inmates with severe behavioral health issues. One opponent says the veto means "taxpayers will continue to pay millions in settlements for over utilizing an outdated and inhumane jail management tool."

Veto Message: HB 175 oversimplifies isolated confinement in such a way so as to eliminate flexibility and endanger the lives of inmates and staff alike. It is possible that a serious youthful offender poses a threat to, or actually engages in a pattern of harmful behavior toward other inmates or staff--HB 175 would prevent the correctional facility from utilizing restricted housing for this inmate.

Legislative Outcome: Passed House 38-22-10 on Mar/11/17; Passed Senate 29-3-10 on Mar/17/17; State Sen. Joe Cervantes voted YES; Vetoed on Apr/6/17

Source: N.M. Political Report on New Mexico voting record HB 175 Mar 17, 2017

Yvette Herrell: Opposed restricting use of solitary confinement on minors

HB 175: Isolated Confinement Act:

Analysis by N.M. Political Report: HB175 restricted certain types of solitary confinement in jails. The bill would have prohibited confining pregnant women, teenagers or inmates with severe behavioral health issues. One opponent says the veto means "taxpayers will continue to pay millions in settlements for over utilizing an outdated and inhumane jail management tool."

Veto Message: HB 175 oversimplifies isolated confinement in such a way so as to eliminate flexibility and endanger the lives of inmates and staff alike. It is possible that a serious youthful offender poses a threat to, or actually engages in a pattern of harmful behavior toward other inmates or staff--HB 175 would prevent the correctional facility from utilizing restricted housing for this inmate.

Legislative Outcome: Passed House 38-22-10 on Mar/11/17; State Rep. Yvette Herrell voted NO; Passed Senate 29-3-10 on Mar/17/17; Vetoed on Apr/6/17

Source: N.M. Political Report on New Mexico voting record HB 175 Mar 11, 2017

Susana Martinez: Collect DNA from felons

We funded bold education reform; passed stricter penalties on repeat DWI offenders; expanded Katie's law to collect DNA from felons; passed Jaydon's Law to give judges the entire criminal history of offenders; protected victims of sexual assault with Rachael's Law; and ended the dangerous practice of giving drivers' licenses to illegal immigrants. We can address challenges while protecting the progress we've made.
Source: 2017 State of the State address to New Mexico Legislature Jan 17, 2017

Susana Martinez: Do away with bail for dangerous criminals

Every judge should have real-time access to the criminal background and history of defendants who appear in their courtrooms--so that sentencing and bail decisions can be made with that information. And we need to amend our Constitution to allow judges to keep the most dangerous criminals in jail--without bail.
Source: 2016 State of the State speech to New Mexico legislature Jan 19, 2016

Susana Martinez: Beef up three strikes law, allow for curfews

Look at our three strikes law. It sounds tough, but it was worded so that it didn't mean anything. No one has ever been incarcerated under that law. Let's put real teeth into it, so we can keep those who commit repeated violent felonies--who repeatedly prey on innocent families--behind bars for life. In addition, skipping out on parole should be a 4th degree felony, and I fully support the bipartisan effort to allow local communities to adopt curfews if it's necessary to keep us safe.
Source: 2016 State of the State speech to New Mexico legislature Jan 19, 2016

Susana Martinez: Mandatory prison time for child abuse

I have spent my life and career helping those who had no voice, particularly children who had been the victim of senseless cruelty, violence, and abuse. I am asking you to join me in standing up for those who are unable to stand for themselves. I'm asking you to increase penalties for child abuse.

Those who abuse children should face severe penalties and mandatory prison time. We must always put justice for victims first. And we are going to change the law and fight to ensure that no one is able to murder someone in our state and get off easy--or get away with it completely--by simply running out the clock.

I am confident we can work together to solve other pressing public safety needs--strengthening Megan's Law to ensure sex offenders cannot live in secret in our neighborhoods, allowing Amber Alerts to be issued when relatives abduct a child and put them in harm's way, and ending the practice of providing driver's licenses to illegal immigrants.

Source: 2012 New Mexico State of the State Address Jan 17, 2012

Bill Richardson: Toughened DWI and sex offender laws

We toughened DWI and sex offender laws by passing stronger penalties. DWI is a non-partisan crisis in New Mexico, and the human toll cuts across party lines, ethnicity, economic status - it is devastating, and unacceptable. I propose multiple DWI offenders forfeit their vehicles-let’s take the weapons out of their hands. My DWI package contains stronger penalties for those who drive drunk with children in the car. And there are new, serious penalties for those who provide alcohol to our children.
Source: 2004 State of the State speech to the New Mexico Legislature Jan 20, 2004

Bill Richardson: Domestic violence incidents start with drinking

Our problems with alcohol abuse aren’t limited to DWI. Experts report the majority of domestic violence incidents start with, or are exacerbated by drinking. That’s why my proposals incorporate domestic violence into increased training for law enforcement officers, tougher penalties for offenders, and increasing treatment options to deal with the underlying problems. I also want to amend our stalking and harassment laws to prohibit electronic, or “cyber” stalking.
Source: 2004 State of the State speech to the New Mexico Legislature Jan 20, 2004

John Sanchez: Reduce age for prosecuting youth offenders from 15 to 13

Sanchez sponsored legislation to change the ages for criminal prosecution.

Excerpts from legislation: HB431 Serious Youthful Offenders Age Designation: AN ACT relating to juvenile justice: BE IT ENACTED:

Source: New Mexico legislative voting record on HB431 Jul 1, 2002

  • The above quotations are from State of New Mexico Politicians: secondary Archives.
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2020 Presidential contenders on Crime:
  Democrats running for President:
Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

2020 Third Party Candidates:
Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Howard Schultz(I-WA)
Gov.Jesse Ventura (I-MN)
Republicans running for President:
Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
Rep.Beto O`Rourke (D-TX)
Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
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Page last updated: Jan 27, 2021