State of Montana Archives: on Government Reform


Steve Daines: Supports Citizen United as free speech issue

Q: Limit campaign spending? Require political ads to disclose their largest funders?

Steve Daines: Mostly no. Voted against dark-money disclosure. Supported Citizens United decision as free speech issue. Supported Senate candidates e-filing finance reports.

Steve Bullock: Yes. Cites "the corrupting influence of money in our politics." As governor, signed a bill to eliminate dark money. Challenged Supreme Court Citizens United decision.

Source: CampusElect on 2020 Montana Senate race Oct 10, 2020

Susan Good Geise: Wants to stop influence of dark money on elections

I needed an avenue to express my support about the need for the rule of law, which I believe has been severely eroded over the last several years. I'm a hard worker and will give this campaign a great deal of effort. I will be talking about issues like fiscal conservatism, the influence of dark money on politics and a return to civility in politics.
Source: Choteau Acantha on 2020 Montana Senate race Apr 28, 2020

John Driscoll: Big focus on limiting donations to campaigns

I am accepting no donations in the primary election campaign, while holding my expenditures to less than the $5,000 threshold required to begin filing campaign finance reports. Through March 31, I have spent $2,474.83, including filing fee. In the general election campaign I will accept from any legal donor, no more than the $1,740 filing fee I paid to become a candidate for the Senate. This allows any person's continuing right to exercise free speech in the form of a campaign contribution, but equally limits contributions to the amount I will accept. This will yield experience for new campaign finance legislation aiming to disqualify any candidate who accepts more than an amount equal to the filing fee from any one donor. The disqualifying offense would be the crime of graft. I hope to help relieve them [U.S. Senators] of the burden of constantly having to raise money, at times from special interests.
Source: The Missoulian on 2020 Montana Senate race Apr 15, 2020

Susan Good Geise: Mail-in ballots allow everyone to vote

Lewis and Clark County announced Tuesday they are holding the primary election on June 2 through mail ballot. "We are taking this pandemic very seriously and looking at all available options for doing County business during this difficult time. Elections are essential and critical and by making the decision to do a mail ballot election, we are encouraging everyone to vote. This decision protects voters, election judges and staff while still allowing the public's voice to be heard."
Source: MontanaRightNow.com on 2020 Montana Senate race Mar 31, 2020

Susan Good Geise: Stop the partisan circus in county elections

Susan Good Geise has called for nonpartisan county elections and was the only local voice who weighed in on the issue. "We didn't do any big ad campaign. I personally paid for an ad in the Blackfoot Valley Dispatch, but it clearly said 'Paid for by Susan Good Geise. It's a picture of a print I have of an elephant and a donkey and they're being jockeyed by monkeys and the audience is all monkeys, too. And it said, 'If you've had enough of this partisan circus, vote nonpartisan.' "
Source: The Missoulian on 2020 Montana Senate race Nov 6, 2019

Greg Gianforte: Rolling back regulations leads to prosperity

Gianforte told the state House he wants to see Montana take a cue from the federal government and cut taxes and abolish regulations to expand the state's economy. Gianforte called for the government to "get out of the way so all Montanans and Americans can prosper again." To continue growth, Gianforte said, both Montana and the federal government need to continue to roll back regulations and enact tax reforms.
Source: Helena Independent-Record on 2020 Montana gubernatorial race Feb 4, 2019

Jon Tester: Spotlight Act: no dark money in campaigns

Q: Campaign Finance: Require political ads to disclose their largest funders? Positon on Citizens United decision, allowing unlimited political donations from corporations & unions?

Matt Rosendale (R): No. Voted against state bill requiring independent groups to reveal how money they contribute to election campaigns is being used & where it's coming from. Supports Supreme Court's Citizens United ruling as protecting freedom of speech.

Jon Tester (D): Yes. Introduced Spotlight Act, requiring political nonprofits to disclose donors. "Dark money is a threat to our democracy. I will do everything I can to defend Montanans from this shadowy behavior." Opposed Citizens United ruling.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Montana Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Jon Tester: Introduced bill to ensure Native American voting access

Q: Voting Rights: Support stricter voting rules even if they prevent some people from voting?

Matt Rosendale (R): Yes. Voted to repeal same-day voter registration. Require government-issued photo identification to vote.

Jon Tester (D): Unclear on photo ID. Introduced bill to ensure Native American voting access.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org Issue Guide on Montana Senate race Oct 9, 2018

Matt Rosendale: No campaign donor disclosure; yes Citizens United

Q: Campaign Finance: Require political ads to disclose their largest funders? Positon on Citizens United decision, allowing unlimited political donations from corporations & unions?

Matt Rosendale (R): No. Voted against state bill requiring independent groups to reveal how money they contribute to election campaigns is being used & where it's coming from. Supports Supreme Court's Citizens United ruling as protecting freedom of speech.

Jon Tester (D): Yes. Introduced Spotlight Act, requiring political nonprofits to disclose donors. "Dark money is a threat to our democracy. I will do everything I can to defend Montanans from this shadowy behavior." Opposed Citizens United ruling.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org: Montana legislative voting records Oct 9, 2018

Matt Rosendale: Voted to repeal same-day voter registration

Q: Voting Rights: Support stricter voting rules even if they prevent some people from voting?

Matt Rosendale (R): Yes. Voted to repeal same-day voter registration. Require government-issued photo identification to vote.

Jon Tester (D): Unclear on photo ID. Introduced bill to ensure Native American voting access.

Source: 2018 CampusElect.org: Montana legislative voting records Oct 9, 2018

Matt Rosendale: D.C. corrupts; commits to serving only two terms

We've seen politicians not representing us. They get swept up in the power and lose sight of serving the people. That's why, if I'm elected, I'll only serve two terms. As I've watched politicians go to Washington, abandon our Montana values, and embrace the lifestyle of Washington D.C., it has reinforced why we need term limits to ensure our elected officials are held accountable, serve the people, take care of business, and come home.
Source: NBC MT/KECI on 2020 Montana Senate race May 21, 2018

Albert Olszewski: Term limits set for members of Congress

Q: Should there be term limits set for members of Congress?

A: Albert Olszewski's answer: Yes

Source: iSideWith.com on 2018 Montana Senate race Jan 1, 2018

Albert Olszewski: Require photo ID to vote

Q: Should a photo ID be required to vote?

A: Albert Olszewski's answer: Yes

Source: iSideWith.com on 2018 Montana Senate race Jan 1, 2018

Matt Rosendale: Get Feds out of the way of the states

Montanans are fed up with politicians who say one thing back home but vote another way in Washington, D.C. The people of Montana deserve a senator who will defend our way of life, get the federal government out of the way, and return power to the hardworking people who make this country great. It's time to get down to business and let Montanans run their lives the way they want.
Source: 2018 Senate campaign website, MattForMontana.com Aug 2, 2017

Steve Bullock: Primary allows spending $667K instead of returning it

Gov. Steve Bullock picked up a primary challenger for the June 7 elections, a former Democratic legislator who donated to the governor's re-election campaign before deciding to run against him.

Bill McChesney's entry into the race allows Bullock to spend $666,642 in campaign contributions he has in the bank earmarked for the primary. He has already spent nearly $136,000 in campaign funds meant for the primary election. State law requires candidates to return the money if they run unopposed.

"Steve welcomes others into the race and looks forward to earning the nomination and then a second term so he can continue to move Montana forward," Bullock's campaign manager said in a statement.

Bullock's campaign has been singularly focused on defeating Greg Gianforte, the Republican candidate and Bozeman tech entrepreneur, in November's general election. Gianforte does not have a primary opponent.

Source: The Missoulian on 2016 Montana gubernatorial race Mar 11, 2016

Greg Gianforte: Eliminate excessive regulations that burden businesses

Accountability in State Government: Montana's government should serve the people of Montana, not the other way around. We need agency heads who have walked in the shoes of people they are serving, to improve efficiency across all levels of government, and eliminate excessive regulations that are burdening businesses.
Source: 2016 Montana governor's campaign website GregForMontana.com Feb 3, 2016

Amanda Curtis: When wealthy in Congress, playing field tilts to wealthy

"I might have the chance now to go across the state and say with a loud, aggressive voice that Steve Daines is wrong for Montana," Curtis said. Not because he was successful in business and earned millions, she says, but wrong in part because Congress has enough of those people already.

"We all need to remember that Washington, D.C., is full of folks that have done incredibly well for themselves and when you send folks to Washington, D.C., who have done incredibly well for themselves, they take votes that tilt the playing field to the wealthy and against us regular working folks," she said.

Source: Billings Gazette on 2014 Montana Senate race Aug 16, 2014

Sam Rankin: Special interests support the status quo; Americans don't

We all know congress is doing a dreadful job on behalf of the American people. But one group thinks they're doing great: the big money special interest donors who continue to support the status quo every election cycle because they're getting exactly what they pay for! A congress acting in THEIR best interests, not representing the American people.

Currently 42% of Americans identify themselves as Independents and it shows there is a major out-migration from the major political parties. Voters want another choice other than choosing between two candidates who are both controlled by special interests, corporations, or wealthy individual donors. It's time for Independents to work together.

Source: 2014 Montana Senate campaign website, SamRankin.com Jul 27, 2014

Sam Rankin: Eliminate earmarks; 3-year federal pay freeze

Source: 2014 Montana Senate campaign website, SamRankin.com Jul 27, 2014

Champ Edmunds: Photo ID for voting

Question topic: People should be able to vote without photo identification.

Edmunds: Strongly Disagree

Source: Faith2Action iVoterGuide on 2014 Montana Senate race Jul 2, 2014

Steve Bullock: Dark money makes our elections into auctions

I hope you will also help me preserve the integrity of our elections. In the century following the passage of the Corrupt Practices Act, Montana has benefitted from a strong citizen democracy. In the past several years, however, more money than ever before has been spent on political campaigns--both nationally & in Montana. As Attorney General, I fought to preserve our citizen democracy and stem the tide of this corporate money in our elections.

We have seen the rise of so-called "dark money" groups that target candidates, yet refuse to tell the voting public who they really are and what they really represent. They hide behind made-up names and made-up newspapers. They operate out of PO Boxes or Washington, D.C., office buildings.

Help me reform our laws, so that any organization spending money during the course of an election reveals the amount it spends and the source of its money. Together, let's guarantee that our elections will never be auctions, controlled by anonymous bidders.

Source: 2013 State of the State Address to Montana legislature Jan 30, 2013

Amanda Curtis: Limit campaign contributions; and no photo ID's to vote

Q: Do you support limits on the following types of contributions for state candidates: Individual?

A: Yes.

Q: Political Action Committee?

A: Yes.

Q: Corporate?

A: Yes.

Q: Political Party?

A: Yes.

Q: Should candidates for state office be encouraged to meet voluntary spending limits?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring full and timely disclosure of campaign finance information?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support the use of an independent AND/OR bipartisan commission for redistricting?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring a government-issued photo identification in order to vote at the polls?

A: No.

Source: Montana Legislative Election 2012 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2012

Champ Edmunds: No limits on political contributions

Do you support limits on the following types of contributions for state candidates: Individual?

A: No.

Q: Political Action Committee?

A: No.

Q: Corporate?

A: No.

Q: Political Party?

A: No.

Q: Should candidates for state office be encouraged to meet voluntary spending limits?

A: No.

Q: Do you support requiring full and timely disclosure of campaign finance information?

A: No.

Q: Do you support the use of an independent AND/OR bipartisan commission for redistricting?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring a government-issued photo identification in order to vote at the polls?

A: Yes.

Source: Montana Legislative Election 2012 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2012

Matt Rosendale: Yes voter ID; but also independent redistricting

Q: Do you support the use of an independent AND/OR bipartisan commission for redistricting?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring a government-issued photo identification in order to vote at the polls?

A: Yes.

Q: Should candidates for state office be encouraged to meet voluntary spending limits?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring full and timely disclosure of campaign finance information?

A: Yes.

Source: Montana 2012 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2012

Sam Rankin: Excessive campaign money is our country's greatest problem

Q: Do you support the regulation of indirect campaign contributions from corporations and unions?

A: Yes.

Rankin adds, "Excessive Campaign Money is our country's greatest problems presently."

Source: Montana Election 2012 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2012

Dennis Rehberg: It's not about campaign spending; it's government spending

Early on in the debate, both candidates were asked several questions about outside spending and the relentless negative advertising voters have been subjected to this cycle. Rehberg attempted to steer the topic back toward one of his favorite talking points. "It's not about campaign spending," he said of the Senate race. "It's about government spending." This race has seen close to $20 million in spending by third party groups.

Tester, ever the opponent of Citizens United, acknowledged the problem in his closing statement. "We're back in 1912," he said, harkening back to the days of Montana's Copper Kings. "We've come back to a time when corporations can give unlimited amounts of money, secret money, and influence the political structure of this country. And that's scary for a democracy."

But Rehberg, who had no response when asked directly how much outside interests had spent in this race, doesn't seem to be too troubled by where that money is coming from.

Source: Missoula News on 2012 Montana Senate debate Oct 22, 2012

Jon Tester: Citizens United is scary for democracy

Early on in the debate, both candidates were asked several questions about outside spending and the relentless negative advertising voters have been subjected to this cycle. Rehberg attempted to steer the topic back toward one of his favorite talking points. "It's not about campaign spending," he said of the Senate race. "It's about government spending." This race has seen close to $20 million in spending by third party groups.

Tester, ever the opponent of Citizens United, acknowledged the problem in his closing statement. "We're back in 1912," he said, harkening back to the days of Montana's Copper Kings. "We've come back to a time when corporations can give unlimited amounts of money, secret money, and influence the political structure of this country. And that's scary for a democracy."

But Rehberg, who had no response when asked directly how much outside interests had spent in this race, doesn't seem to be too troubled by where that money is coming from.

Source: Missoula News on 2012 Montana Senate debate Oct 22, 2012

Dennis Rehberg: Citizens United ok: political free speech is most important

Tester was critical of the Citizens United Supreme Court case that has allowed corporations to have unfettered involvement in political spending. "We've seen tens of millions of dollars of secret money come into this state to define me as something I'm not," said Tester, who called for transparency about who contributes to political action committees.

Rehberg appeared to speak favorably of Citizens United, saying political free speech is the most important, but he added that he supports 100 percent transparency with campaign donations.

The problem, Tester pointed out, is that Citizens United doesn't require transparency in reporting political contributions.

Source: Daily Inter Lake on 2012 Montana Senate debates Oct 14, 2012

Dennis Rehberg: Supports cutting Public Broadcasting Service & Americorps

Rehberg was challenged about supporting cuts for the Public Broadcasting Service, Americorps and community health clinics that provide preventive care to women.

That served as an opportunity for Libertarian candidate Cox to jump in: "They're only talking about nibbling at the edges of some the proposed increases in federal spending," Cox said, adding that the country is likely to face $1.7 trillion in additional deficit spending next year. "We're talking about cutting PBS. Let's get real."

Source: Daily Inter Lake on 2012 Montana Senate debates Oct 14, 2012

Jon Tester: Oppose Citizens United: limit corporate political spending

Tester was critical of the Citizens United Supreme Court case that has allowed corporations to have unfettered involvement in political spending. "We've seen tens of millions of dollars of secret money come into this state to define me as something I'm not," said Tester, who called for transparency about who contributes to political action committees.

Rehberg appeared to speak favorably of Citizens United, saying political free speech is the most important, but he added that he supports 100 percent transparency with campaign donations.

The problem, Tester pointed out, is that Citizens United doesn't require transparency in reporting political contributions.

Source: Daily Inter Lake on 2012 Montana Senate debates Oct 14, 2012

Dennis Rehberg: There should be nothing more free than political free speech

Jon Tester stated that the widely criticized Citizens United ruling puts democracy at risk by giving corporations more power than people. The Supreme Court ruling undid past restrictions on political spending by corporations and special interest groups.

The decision has been derided by many Montana politicians. Montana, 21 other states and the District of Columbia have asked the high court to rule that Citizens United doesn't apply to Montana's or other state laws regulating corporate campaign spending.

Rehberg said he supported the 2010 ruling, although he added that there should be full transparency on where campaign money is coming from. "There should be nothing more free than political free speech," he said.

Tester responded that "corporations are not people. Because of Citizens United, corporations have more rights when it comes to donations than people do," he said.

Source: The Republic on 2012 Montana Senate debates Jun 17, 2012

Jon Tester: Citizens United ruling puts democracy at risk

Jon Tester stated that the widely criticized Citizens United ruling puts democracy at risk by giving corporations more power than people. The Supreme Court ruling undid past restrictions on political spending by corporations and special interest groups.

The decision has been derided by many Montana politicians. Montana, 21 other states and the District of Columbia have asked the high court to rule that Citizens United doesn't apply to Montana's or other state laws regulating corporate campaign spending.

Rehberg said he supported the 2010 ruling, although he added that there should be full transparency on where campaign money is coming from. "There should be nothing more free than political free speech," he said.

Tester responded that "corporations are not people. Because of Citizens United, corporations have more rights when it comes to donations than people do," he said.

Source: The Republic on 2012 Montana Senate debates Jun 17, 2012

Dennis Rehberg: Citizens United: nothing more free than political speech

Rehberg defended the Supreme Court campaign finance ruling "Citizens United" as vital to free speech. Incumbent Democrat Jon Tester responded that the widely criticized ruling puts democracy at risk by giving corporations more power than people. The Supreme Court ruling undid past restrictions on political spending by corporations and special interest groups.

The decision has been derided by many Montana politicians. Montana, 21 other states and the District of Columbia have asked the high court t Citizens United doesn't apply to Montana's or other state laws regulating corporate campaign spending. Rehberg said he supported the 2010 ruling, although he added that there should be full transparency on where campaign money is coming from. "There should be nothing more free than political free speech," he said.

Tester responded that "corporations are not people. Because of Citizens United, corporations have more rights when it comes to donations than people do," he said.

Source: New England Cable News on 2012 Montana Senate debate Jun 16, 2012

Bill McChesney: Limit all types of state campaign contributions

Q: Do you support limits on the following types of contributions to candidates for state government: Individual?

A: Yes.

Q: Political Action Committee?

A: Yes.

Q: Corporate?

A: Yes.

Q: Political Party?

A: Yes.

Q: Should candidates for state office be encouraged to meet voluntary spending limits?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring full and timely disclosure of campaign finance information?

A: Yes.

Source: Montana State Congressional 2010 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2010

Michael Lange: Limit PAC donations, and full public disclosure

Federal campaigns have become all about how much money the candidate can raise, thus giving disproportionate power to big money contributors. I would support lowering the amount that PACs can donate to federal campaigns, lowering the amount that individuals can donate to federal races, and require full and public disclosure from candidates when they accept donations from a specific PAC. Also, I continue to support term limits for all federal candidates.
Source: Montana Congressional Election 2008 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2008

Ryan Zinke: Limit PAC, corporate, and individual campaign donations

Q: Do you support the current limit of terms for Montana governors?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support the current limit of terms for Montana state senators and representatives?

A: No.

Q: Do you support limiting the following types of contributions to state legislative candidates? Individual?

A: Yes.

Q: PAC?

A: Yes.

Q: Corporate?

A: Yes.

Q: Political Parties?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring full and timely disclosure of campaign finance information?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support imposing spending limits on state-level political campaigns?

A: No.

Q: Should Montana participate in the federal REAL ID program?

A: I support the requirement for a valid Montana ID for all elections.

Source: Montana Congressional 2008 Political Courage Test Nov 1, 2008

Mike Cooney: Limit campaign contributions; adopt statewide voting rules

Q: Do you support limiting contributions to state legislative candidates?

A: Yes, on individual, PAC, corporate, and political party contributions.

Q: Do you support adopting statewide standards for counting, verifying and ensuring accuracy of votes?

A: Yes

Q: Do you support prohibiting media exit polling of voters until all polling locations in Montana are closed?

A: Yes

Source: 2006 Montana Gubernatorial National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2006

Conrad Burns: Earmarks let me bring Montana a share of federal money

Q: Which of the 34 Montana earmarks in the latest transportation bill qualify as unjustified pork?

TESTER: Earmarking in the middle of the night, without transparency, is wrong for representative democracy.

JONES: Incumbents always put something in the transportation bill so they can brag about all the money they brought to the state. None of the 34 are qualified.

BURNS: Iím proud about what I brought back to Montana. Most of it is for infrastructure [in that bill]. That moneyís going to be spent somewhere in America, and I want Montana to get her share. If you leave it up to a faceless un-elected bureaucrat, with only 900,000 people, tell me how much weíre gonna get? Earmarks have to withstand the scrutiny of the subcommittee hearing, the full Committee hearing, & the full Senate. I have to go out & defend them, and itís pretty hard sometimes. We defend them, our name is on them, and thatís the way the process works. If they canít stand the scrutiny, they will not make it.

Source: 2006 Montana 3-way Senate Debate at MSU Oct 9, 2006

Jon Tester: Earmarks without transparency are wrong for democracy

Q: Which of the 34 Montana earmarks in the latest transportation bill qualify as unjustified pork?

TESTER: The current process of earmarking in the middle of the night, without transparency, is the wrong way for representative democracy to be working. Good projects, like this land-grant university, can stand up to the scrutiny of the light of day. Quite frankly, I donít support earmarks, period.

If a projectís a good project, which includes probably most if not all of those 34 earmarks, they could withstand scrutiny in front of the entire Congress. Iím not for earmarks because they donít pass public scrutiny with the transparency that our government and our forefathers set up.

JONES: Incumbents always put something in the transportation bill so they can brag about all the money they brought to the state. None of the 34 are qualified.

BURNS: Iím proud about what I brought back to Montana. That moneyís going to be spent somewhere in America, and I want Montana to get her share.

Source: 2006 Montana 3-way Senate Debate at MSU Oct 9, 2006

Jon Tester: K-Street cronies control Congressional spending decisions

Q: How would you reduce the federal deficit?

A: Iíd start with no-bid contracts in Iraq. Thatís kind of wild. Then negotiations for Medicare Part D prescription drugs--I negotiate when I go to buy a pickup truck, so we ought to be negotiating-- but thatís what happens when you have big pharmaceutical companies writing legislation. Itís time that we spend the money wiser, that we prioritize better, and start looking out for middle class folks. But thatís not the people who have control- the cronies on K-Street that buy votes have more control than the folks that elect us. You need to have people back there in Washington who have experience balancing a checkbook and setting priorities. I have balanced a checkbook in the private sector and in the public sector. My opponent has not been able to do that.

Source: 2006 Montana 3-way Senate Debate at MSU Oct 9, 2006

Stan Jones: Earmarks are unconstitutional incumbency protection

Q: Which of the 34 Montana earmarks in the latest transportation bill qualify as unjustified pork?

TESTER: The current process of earmarking in the middle of the night, without transparency, is the wrong way for representative democracy to be working.

JONES: Which qualify as unjustified pork? ALL of them. The federal transportation bill has become the true pork-barrel bill that Congress uses to enhance the ability of incumbents to get re-elected. They always put something in this bill so they can brag about all the money they brought to the state, all of which most likely is unconstitutional. Transportation bills should be for transportation. And very little federal money should be spent on transportation. Transportation is a state issue and should be funded by state funds. All 34 earmarks are unconstitutional and should be eliminated.

BURNS: Iím proud about what I brought back to Montana. That moneyís going to be spent somewhere in America, and I want Montana to get her share.

Source: 2006 Montana 3-way Senate Debate at MSU Oct 9, 2006

Bob Kelleher: Limit all types of political contributions, and spending

Q: Do you support limiting the following types of contributions to candidates: Individual?

A: Yes.

Q: PAC?

A: Yes.

Q: Corporate?

A: Yes.

Q: Political Parties?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring full and timely disclosure of campaign finance information??

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support imposing spending limits on state level political campaigns?

A: Yes.

Q:

Source: Montana 2004 Gubernatorial National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2004

Brian Schweitzer: Refuses special interest & PAC money for his campaign

Special interests have had far too much influence in Montana for far too long. I will not accept one cent of PAC or special interest money. I support full campaign finance disclosure and tougher ethics laws for lobbyists. To learn more about my proposed ethics reforms, please visit www.brianschweitzer.com. As Governor, I will work to enact policies that benefit the people of Montana, not special interests.
Source: 2004 Montana Gubernatorial National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2004

Corey Stapleton: Limit political contributions; plus full disclosure

Do you support limiting the following types of contributions to state legislative candidates: Individual?

A: Yes.

Q: PAC?

A: Yes.

Q: Corporate?

A: Yes.

Q: Political Parties?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring full and timely disclosure of campaign finance information?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support imposing spending limits on state level political campaigns?

A: No.

Q: Do you support partial funding from state taxes for state level political campaigns?

A: No.

Q: Do you support voting on-line?

A: No.

Q: Do you support on-line voter registration?

A: No.

Q: Do you support increasing the number of signatures required to place an initiative on the ballot?

A: Yes.

Source: 2000 Montana State National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2000

John Bohlinger: Supports term limits & campaign contribution limits

Do you support the current law, which limits the number of terms of the following Montana officials: State Senators and Representatives?

A: Yes.

Q: Governor?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support limiting the following types of contributions to state legislative candidates: Individual?

A: Yes.

Q: PAC?

A: Yes.

Q: Corporate?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support requiring full and timely disclosure of campaign finance information?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support imposing spending limits on state level political campaigns?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support partial funding from state taxes for state level political campaigns?

A: No.

Q: Would you vote to ratify an amendment to the U.S. Constitution requiring an annual balanced federal budget?

A: Yes.

Q: Do you support the current Montana law that prohibits corporate expenditures on ballot-measure campaigns?

A: Yes.

Source: Montana Legislative 1998 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 1998

  • The above quotations are from State of Montana Politicians: Archives.
  • Click here for definitions & background information on Government Reform.
  • Click here for other issues (main summary page).
2020 Presidential contenders on Government Reform:
  Democrats running for President:
Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

2020 Third Party Candidates:
Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Howard Schultz(I-WA)
Gov.Jesse Ventura (I-MN)
Republicans running for President:
Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
Rep.Beto O`Rourke (D-TX)
Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
Please consider a donation to OnTheIssues.org!
Click for details -- or send donations to:
1770 Mass Ave. #630, Cambridge MA 02140
E-mail: submit@OnTheIssues.org
(We rely on your support!)

Page last updated: Jan 28, 2021