State of Oklahoma Archives: on Government Reform


Abby Broyles: Justice Dept. breaking public trust in stock investigation

Inhofe had little to say after being notified that he was no longer being investigated by the Department of Justice for stock trades made on his behalf earlier this year not long after some Senate members were briefed on the COVID-19 threat. "It's clear that the most political Department of Justice in the history of the United States is guilty of breaking public trust if not the law itself by clearing these senators," Abby Broyles said in a statement.
Source: Tulsa World on 2020 Oklahoma Senate race May 31, 2020

Kevin Stitt: Add photo ID & notarization requirement for absentee voting

Legislative Summary:SB1779: An Act relating to elections; prohibiting absentee ballot harvesting in certain elections.

Oklahoma Policy Institute analysis: Just a day after the Oklahoma Supreme Court removed barriers to absentee voting, the Oklahoma Legislature is quietly advancing a bill to make it harder to vote by mail. SB 1779 would require voters to include a photocopy of identification, which would put Oklahoma as one of only three states with similar requirements. In 2021, it would reinstate the notarization requirement--the very one struck down by the Supreme Court.

Legislative Outcome: Passed House 88-1-11 on Mar/15/20; Passed Senate 43-0-4 on May/15/20; Signed by Governor Kevin Stitt on May/21/20

Source: Oklahoma Policy Institute on Oklahoma voting record SB1779 May 21, 2020

Stephanie Bice: Add photo ID & notarization requirement for absentee voting

Legislative Summary:SB1779: An Act relating to elections; prohibiting absentee ballot harvesting in certain elections.

Oklahoma Policy Institute analysis: Just a day after the Oklahoma Supreme Court removed barriers to absentee voting, the Oklahoma Legislature is quietly advancing a bill to make it harder to vote by mail. SB 1779 would require voters to include a photocopy of identification, which would put Oklahoma as one of only three states with similar requirements. In 2021, it would reinstate the notarization requirement--the very one struck down by the Supreme Court.

Legislative Outcome: Passed House 88-1-11 on Mar/15/20; Passed Senate 43-0-4 on May/15/20; State Sen. Stephanie Bice voted YES; Signed by Governor Kevin Stitt on May/21/20

Source: Oklahoma Policy Institute on Oklahoma voting record SB1779 May 15, 2020

Kevin Stitt: Reclaim executive powers: more accountable than agencies

Our state Constitution vests supreme executive power in the Governor, but too often that executive power has been delegated by statute to boards that are not directly accountable to the citizens of Oklahoma. State government today is much larger than it was 112 years ago. As a result, accountability for those in power is spread too thin and, at times, it seems as if no one is really in charge. Let's not wait for another crisis to start making this necessary reform across our largest agencies. We will also reimagine state government so that our customers--Oklahoma taxpayers--are the primary focus. This is why I have placed a special emphasis in my administration on the digital transformation of state agencies. I am calling for the Legislature to fund a $20 million grant program where agencies can apply to receive funds to bring their services into the 21st Century and to make government more customer-centered and efficient.
Source: 2019 State of the State address to the Oklahoma legislature Feb 4, 2019

Kevin Stitt: Set aside more of the budget surplus

When we look at states where the economy depends on the price of oil, they place a strong emphasis on saving during the good years. One thing we know is true, oil prices are going to go up and oil prices are going to go down. I am setting a goal for Oklahoma to have $1 billion in our savings by the end of FY20. We must set aside an additional $250 million from revenue growth. Being conservative with our budget surplus will protect Oklahoma from having to cut core services in the future.

The balance of Oklahoma's Quick Action Closing Fund is $4.3 million. By comparison, the latest legislative report for the Texas Enterprise Fund indicates the state has awarded $609 million from its Quick Action Closing Fund, resulting in 94,347 jobs. In Arkansas, their fund has awarded over $120 million, resulting in 26,684 jobs. You can help me sign on the dotted line for new opportunities to grow Oklahoma and demonstrate to the nation that Oklahoma is not afraid to compete with our neighbors.

Source: 2019 State of the State address to the Oklahoma legislature Feb 4, 2019

Drew Edmondson: Advocate of open transparency; the public has right to know

We start by cracking down on those who broke it--the lobbying industry and corrupting political donations and establishing new transparency rules. And I'll establish an Office of Open Government within the governor's office to facilitate the public's right to know.ˇ The Fallin administration's practice of stonewalling the public ends with me.
Source: 2018 gubernatorial campaign website DrewForOklahoma.com Jun 23, 2018

Chris Powell: No opinion on making voter registration easier

Q: Do you support or oppose the statement, "Make voter registration easier"?

A: Neither.

Source: OnTheIssues interview of 2018 Oklahoma Governor candidate May 15, 2018

Joe Maldonado: Make elections and voting fair

Q: Do you support or oppose the statement, "Make voter registration easier"?

A: Make it fair and not change the rules according to who is running.

Source: OnTheIssues interview of 2018 Oklahoma Governor candidate May 15, 2018

Drew Edmondson: Blames revenue shortfall on corporate donors and lobbyists

Edmondson said he will "put Oklahomans first and take on the outside interests and partisan politicians who are trying to hurt our way of life." He said the legislature had a chance to set Oklahoma back on solid financial footing but the state has been hit with its 4th straight year of revenue shortfall. "If they aren't willing to stand up to their corporate donors and their lobbyists and do what's right, I'm prepared to put a plan before the people and let them vote," he said.
Source: Sequoyah County Times on 2018 Oklahoma gubernatorial race Mar 7, 2018

Kevin Stitt: Step Up Oklahoma: Fix broken government; level playing field

I support some of the Step Up Oklahoma's governance ideas, such as budget-line itemizing and a budget stabilization fund. I also endorse total tax reform once we have addressed our broken government. Any effort to modernize our tax code must be for the purpose of spurring a free market and leveling the playing field so that we are no longer incentivizing certain industries over others at a cost to Oklahoma.
Source: The Oklahoman Kevin Stitt OpEd: 2018 Oklahoma Governor race Feb 7, 2018

Gary Jones: Increased audits despite budget cuts

Gary has sought to expand government accountability and improve the delivery of government services. Besides being a CPA, he is also a Certified Fraud Examiner. Despite a steady decrease in appropriated funds to conduct various audits of public entities, under his leadership the State Auditor's Office has increased the quantity of audits it conducts without sacrificing the quality of the work product and he's doubled the number of CPAs on staff.
Source: 2018 Oklahoma Gubernatorial website JonesOK2018.com Aug 8, 2017

Mike Workman: Supports automatic voter registration

Workman's campaign issues are all in the right place: he's for income equality, a $15 minimum wage, expanding the Affordable Care Act with the goal of eventual universal coverage, comprehensive immigration reform including a path to citizenship, and automatic voter registration. He's unapologetically pro-choice and in favor of common sense gun laws, although in Oklahoma he might get farther by advocating the sale of assault rifles to fetuses.
Source: Wonkette.com on 2016 Oklahoma Senate race Jun 26, 2016

James Inhofe: Photo ID for voting

Question topic: People should be able to vote without photo identification.

Inhofe: Strongly Disagree

Source: Faith2Action iVoterGuide on 2014 Oklahoma Senate race Sep 30, 2014

Matt Silverstein: Not a dime from any lobbyists in campaign donations

Sen. Jim Inhofe banked nearly $787,000 for his re-election campaign from July through September, while Democratic challenger Matt Silverstein topped $100,000 in his first full quarter of fundraising. The senator's haul included more than $152,000 from political action committees.

"We still have over a year to go and we will continue to gain steam," Silverstein said in a statement. "We're also proud we haven't taken a dime from any lobbyists."

Source: The Oklahoman on 2014 Oklahoma Senate debate Oct 25, 2013

Rick Weiland: Voluntarily limit campaign contributions to maximum of $100

Weiland said, "Mike Rounds has now caved in twice, to big money by boasting he will raise $9 million from out of state big money sources, and also to the extreme right wing of the GOP by supporting Ted Cruz's blackmail scheme [shutting down] the United States government. I call on him to explain why he has thrown his lot in with Cruz and the extremists when his entire career, until he decided he had to pander to win a primary election, was in opposition to the kind of big money extremism he has now embraced," Weiland said.

At the beginning of his campaign, Weiland issued a pledge to Rounds asking him to agree to limit contributions to both campaigns to a maximum of $100. Rounds refused the pledge and also turned down Weiland's offer to meet with him to discuss ways in which they could reduce the impact of big money on the race.

Source: AdWatch: Weiland campaign email: 2014 Oklahoma Senate debate Oct 15, 2013

Matt Silverstein: Inhofe says he's for term limits, but was in for 26 years

As Silverstein spoke about Inhofe, it was increasingly clear that he was painting him as an unprincipled "creature of Washington" whose seemingly self-serving principles are troubling to voters, while at the same time being increasingly out of touch with the everyday needs of 21st century Oklahomans.

"Jim Inhofe has been on the taxpayer's payroll since 1967," noted Silverstein. "He is now asking for 26 years in the US Senate, the entire time saying he supports term limits for politicians."

Source: RedDirtReport.com coverage of 2014 Oklahoma Senate race Aug 13, 2013

Jim Bridenstine: First Amendment includes campaign spending

Q: Do you support the regulation of indirect campaign contributions from corporations and unions?

A: No. The First Amendment prohibits any infringement on free speech. People have the right to spend their own money as they wish to support political campaigns. Corporations and unions should be able to make direct and indirect contributions to campaigns. However, those contributions and the identities of the entities receiving them must be disclosed. No corporate or union funds derived from union dues or other payments compulsory as a condition of employment should be eligible as a source of direct or indirect campaign contributions.

Source: Oklahoma Congressional 2012 Political Courage Test Oct 30, 2012

James Lankford: Extend indefinitely pledge against earmarks

In 2010, House Republicans pledged not to request any earmarks for one year. That pledge should be extended indefinitely and the earmark process should be abolished from the House rules unless there are significant reforms to the earmark process.

Stop spending so much money! Stop spending what we do not have! The reason the federal government does not have enough money is because it is doing too many things. My grandparents would NEVER have said, "Things are tough, so I think I will make it easier on me by making it tougher on my grandchildren." But that is exactly what current Washington leaders are doing. Federal government policies should not encourage more personal or national debt.

We must also stop the rapid acceleration of federal regulation to encourage business owners to hire more employees and invest more money. Until we have less federal spending and more private sector hiring, we will not grow our economy and pay down our debt. [Source: jameslankford.com/category/spending ]

Source: Vote-OK.org profile for 2016 Oklahoma Senate race Dec 17, 2010

Joe Dorman: Require photo ID to vote, but extend early voting

Dorman voted YEA on SB4: a bill that requires voters to provide photo identification in order to vote on election day, on April 1, 2009, Bill Passed House (71-27).
Source: Vote Smart's Synopsis of Oklahoma Legislative voting records Apr 1, 2009

Scott Inman: Require photo ID to vote, but extend early voting

Inman voted YEA on SB4: a bill that requires voters to provide photo identification in order to vote on election day, on April 1, 2009, Bill Passed House (71-27).
Source: Vote Smart's Synopsis of Oklahoma Legislative voting records Apr 1, 2009

T.W. Shannon: Require photo ID in order to vote

Shannon voted YEA on April 1, 2009 on Voter Identification Bill (bill passed House, 71-27). Vote Smart's Synopsis:
Source: Vote Smart synopses of Oklahoma voting & endorsement records Apr 1, 2009

Brad Henry: Extend early voting to a full week prior to Election Day

No freedom is more precious than the right to vote. Government of the people and for the people requires participation by the people. Record voter turnouts across the nation last November were cause for celebration, but long lines and discouraging waits were cause for concern.

Early in-person voting has been hugely successful in Oklahoma and other states. I call on you to help boost voter participation by making it easier and more convenient for our citizens to vote. Let's extend early voting in our state by four days, allowing voters to cast their votes for a full week prior to Election Day.

Source: 2009 State of the State address to Oklahoma legislature Mar 2, 2009

Andrew Rice: Most donations from individuals; most of Inhofeís from PACs

Q: In terms of fund-raising, does money for your campaign come more from groups and organizations, or is it from individual donors?

A: The overwhelming majority is from individuals. The only type of group that could give us money is a Political Action Committee, and I think itís accounted for less than 4%. Part of that is the nature of how these campaigns are. When you run against an incumbent, thereís a lot of political action committees that represent different industries, different interest groups that arenít going to go against the incumbent because they donít want to upset the incumbent. Therefore, they may have a bill thatís coming that affects, say, the manufactures, and they want to go see them, and you know. Itís too bad that works, but thatís the way that Washington works. And so, if you look at his [Inhofeís] reports, heís got a tremendous amount of money in PAC money. Probably about half of his money comes from PAC money, compared to a real small minority of mine.

Source: Judd Morse, Ada Evening News on 2008 Oklahoma Senate Debate Jul 9, 2008

Joe Dorman: No campaign contributions to legislators while in session

Dorman voted YEA on HB 2196, Campaign Finance Restrictions (Co-sponsor), Bill Passed House (92-8)
Source: Vote Smart's Synopsis of Oklahoma Legislative voting records Mar 12, 2008

Scott Inman: No campaign contributions to legislators while in session

Inman voted YEA on HB 2196, Campaign Finance Restrictions (Co-sponsor), Bill Passed House (92-8)
Source: Vote Smart's Synopsis of Oklahoma Legislative voting records Mar 12, 2008

Chris Powell: Supports on-line voting & term limits

Source: VoteSmart Oklahoma 2002 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2002

Chris Powell: No campaign donation limits, and no disclosure

Source: VoteSmart Oklahoma 2002 National Political Awareness Test Nov 1, 2002

Frank Keating: Attract people to Oklahoma to regain Congressional seat

I would like to discuss the result and the challenges of the result of the loss of the congressional seat. In 1908, we had eight representatives, and then it was seven, and then it was six, and now it is five. People move to a place because they see it as prosperity filled and business friendly. They move away from a state because they donít see it as prosperity filled and business friendly. Or they donít go to a state, in sufficient numbers, to permit us to be truly competitive with the states around us. But this year, our agenda must be to get our congressman back. That is our agenda for the 2001 session.

Today, we have one overriding goal: To make Oklahoma so prosperous, so attractive, so energetic, so reform minded, so desirable for business location for people and companies and jobs, that we will reclaim our congressional seat in 2011 and add one more. That is our agenda for the year 2001. We are going to get our congressman back.

Source: 2001 State of the State address to Oklahoma legislature Feb 5, 2001

Winona LaDuke: Supports increased party choices for voters

Q: Why are you running for Vice-President on the Green Party ticket?

A: Because people make bad decisions in Washington D.C. Those decisions affect Indian people, and all people, in ways that we are not aware of. I believe in the goals of Ralph Nader and the Green Party because we have essentially a one-party system where all of us are ruled by corporate interests and we have less and less actual voice in how decisions are made.

Source: Interview in Oklahoma Indian Times Jun 1, 2000

  • The above quotations are from State of Oklahoma Politicians: Archives.
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2020 Presidential contenders on Government Reform:
  Democrats running for President:
Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

2020 Third Party Candidates:
Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Howard Schultz(I-WA)
Gov.Jesse Ventura (I-MN)
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Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
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